Lowcountry Digital Library © 2009 Lowcountry Digital Librarypowered by CONTENTdm®

preferenceshelpabout uscontact us
homebrowseadvanced search my favorites
 

Refine Search

Subject
Jews -- South Carolina... (28)
Jews - - South Carolin... (19)
Jews - - South Carolin... (8)
Jews -- South Carolina... (8)
Garfinkel Family (4)
Show more...

Date Recorded
2010-06-19 (3)
1999-09-22 (2)
1997-02-28 (2)
1996-02-16 (2)
1995-01-30 (1)
Show more...

Interviewee
Alfred , Fay Laro , ... (2)
Aronson , Rose Louise... (1)
Aronson, Harold M, 1... (1)
Aronson, Rose Louise ... (1)
Barnett, Patty Levi, ... (1)
Show more...

This is the old Lowcountry Digital Library.
Please visit our NEW WEBSITE HERE http://lcdl.library.cofc.edu for all of this content and more!

Jewish Heritage Collection Oral Histories

 Sort by: Title Description
41.
no preview
available
Jewish Heritage Collection: Oral history interview with Judith Draisen Glassman and Bernice Draisen Goldman
Jewish Heritage Collection: Oral history interview with Judith Draisen Glassman and Bernice Draisen Goldman Judith Glassman and Bernice Goldman, daughters of Hyman and Eunice Poliakoff Draisen, share memories of growing up in the 1950s in Anderson, South Carolina. Among the topics they discuss are the familys music business, their religious training, and the anti-Semitism they encountered. They also describe their careers and immediate families.
42.
no preview
available
Jewish Heritage Collection: Oral history interview with Karl Karesh
Jewish Heritage Collection: Oral history interview with Karl Karesh Karl Karesh, born in 1912, discusses growing up in Charleston, South Carolina, focusing on his neighborhood, the local merchants, his Hebrew school training, and his family and their adherence to Orthodox religious observances. He addresses the differences between the uptown and downtown Jews before World War II, and describes his clothing business, and other Jewish- and gentile-owned dry goods stores, in Charleston during the post-war years.
43.
no preview
available
Jewish Heritage Collection: Oral history interview with Rose Rudnick Rubin
Jewish Heritage Collection: Oral history interview with Rose Rudnick Rubin Rose Rubin, daughter of Polish immigrants Sophie Halpern and Morris Rudnick, recounts stories about her family’s life in the Old Country and her parents’ immigration to New York. Sophie moved with her first husband, Ralph Panitz, to Aiken, South Carolina, for his health. The town had a reputation as a salubrious retreat for people with pulmonary problems. Morris followed his sister, Anne, who had married Solomon Surasky, to Aiken, where he married Sophie after she became widowed. Rose describes her mother’s awareness of the dangers of the Nazi regime and her efforts to convince family members to come to America, and discusses the history of “Happyville,” a Jewish farming community, established just outside of Aiken in 1905. Rose married former state senator Hyman Rubin of Columbia, South Carolina.
44.
no preview
available
Jewish Heritage Collection: Oral history interview with Helen Garfinkel Rosenshein
Jewish Heritage Collection: Oral history interview with Helen Garfinkel Rosenshein Helen "Elkie" Rosenshein recalls childhood friends and neighbors from the 1920s and ’30s in Charleston, South Carolina. Her parents, Sam and Hannah Garfinkel, immigrants from Divin, Russia, followed Sam’s brother to the coastal city and opened a mattress factory. She describes the traditional Jewish foods served by her mother, who kept a kosher home with the help of an African American woman named Louisa. After working at the Charleston Navy Yard, Helen and her good friend, Freda Goldberg, spent a year in San Francisco, where they took advantage of local cultural events and volunteered at the Jewish Community Center.
45.
no preview
available
Jewish Heritage Collection: Oral history interview with Sylvan Rosen and Meyer Rosen
Jewish Heritage Collection: Oral history interview with Sylvan Rosen and Meyer Rosen Sylvan and Meyer Rosen, brothers and natives of Georgetown, South Carolina, recall growing up in the coastal city and socializing regularly with gentiles. The Jewish congregation, Beth Elohim, too small to support a rabbi, received support from Charleston’s Kahal Kadosh Beth Elohim. The brothers name of some of Georgetown’s Jewish families and provide background on their extended families, the Lewenthals, Weinbergs, and Rosens. Their father, Harry Rosen, and their uncle Albert Schneider, who married sisters Dora and Fannie Lewenthal, operated The New Store, which initially sold men’s and ladies’ clothing and later furniture and appliances. Besides practicing law in Georgetown, both men held political office—Sylvan as mayor and Meyer as a state legislator.
46.
no preview
available
Jewish Heritage Collection: Oral history interview with Nathan Addlestone
Jewish Heritage Collection: Oral history interview with Nathan Addlestone Nathan Addlestone, son of Abraham and Rachel Lader Addlestone, immigrants from Bialystok and Lithuania respectively, describes growing up in Charleston, Oakley, and Sumter, South Carolina. His father got his start by peddling and owned a number of dry goods stores before opening a small scrap metal yard. The family was Orthodox and Rachel managed to keep a kosher house all her life. In the 1930s Nathan joined his father in his scrap metal business and, by the next decade, became successful in his own right. Nathan married Ruth Axelrod and they raised two daughters, Carole and Susan, in Sumter and Charleston, South Carolina. After their divorce, he married Marlene Laro Kronsberg.
47.
no preview
available
Jewish Heritage Collection: Oral history interview with Harry Appel
Jewish Heritage Collection: Oral history interview with Harry Appel Harry Appel’s parents, Abraham Appel and Ida Goldberg, emigrated separately from Kaluszyn, Poland, in the early twentieth century. They met, married, and raised three children in Charleston, South Carolina. Their eldest, Harry, born in 1924, talks about his siblings, growing up in the St. Philip Street neighborhood, and Charleston’s synagogues.
48.
no preview
available
Jewish Heritage Collection: Oral history interview with Doris Levkoff Meddin
Jewish Heritage Collection: Oral history interview with Doris Levkoff Meddin Doris Levkoff Meddin recalls her experiences growing up in Augusta, Georgia, where her parents, Shier and Rebecca Rubin Levkoff, ran The Smart Set Dress Shop. Shier and Rebecca, descendants of Russian and Polish immigrants, were born in Charleston, South Carolina. They and their children frequently visited Charleston and summered on Sullivan’s Island and the Isle of Palms. Doris married Hyman Meddin, who was born and raised in Savannah and ran a meat-packing business in Charleston. While raising three children, she devoted her time and energy to philanthropic work. Among her many contributions to local organizations, Doris helped to establish the Pink Ladies, a volunteer group at Roper Hospital, and served as president of the Charleston Area Mental Health Association. As a member of the National Council of Jewish Women, she assisted German refugee Margot Freudenberg after she arrived in Charleston.
49.
no preview
available
Jewish Heritage Collection: Oral history interview with Max Heller and Trude Schönthal Heller
Jewish Heritage Collection: Oral history interview with Max Heller and Trude Schönthal Heller Max and Trude Schönthal Heller discuss growing up in Vienna, Austria, in the 1920s and ’30s, and the hardships and losses their families experienced as a result of the Anschluss, the German invasion of Austria in 1938. They describe how they and their family members escaped Austria and made their separate ways to the United States. Max, by chance, had met Mary Mills of Greenville, South Carolina, while she was visiting Vienna in 1937. He appealed to her for help in leaving Austria. Mary contacted Shep Saltzman, a Jewish man who owned a shirt factory in Greenville, and he sponsored Max’s immigration and gave him a job. Max and Trude, who met at a summer resort in Austria in 1937, married in the United States in 1942, and Trude joined Max in Greenville, where they raised their three children. Max served on Greenville’s city council from 1969-1971, and then was elected mayor for two terms, during which he spearheaded a major revitalization of the city’s downtown.
50.
no preview
available
Jewish Heritage Collection: Oral history interview with Betty Hirsch Lancer
Jewish Heritage Collection: Oral history interview with Betty Hirsch Lancer Betty Hirsch Lancer, the daughter of emigrants from Mogelnitza, Poland, describes growing up in Charleston, South Carolina, in the decades before World War II. Her father acted in New York’s Yiddish theaters with limited success, and his father made and sold schnapps out of his house on St. Philip Street during Prohibition. Betty recalls the Great Depression, discusses how her parents made a living, and mentions other families in Charleston who were from Mogelnitza.
51.
no preview
available
Jewish Heritage Collection: Oral history interview with Alex Davis and Suzanne Lurey
Jewish Heritage Collection: Oral history interview with Alex Davis and Suzanne Lurey Alex Davis, joined by his niece, Suzanne Lurey, who speaks only briefly, discusses his family history and his experiences growing up in Greenville, South Carolina. His father, Victor Davis, opened an auto parts store in Greenville in 1926 and, after he died, Alex and his two brothers, Jack and Louis, ran the family business for nearly four more decades. Alex married Lillian Zaglin, also of Greenville, and they raised two children. He recalls the early leaders of Congregation Beth Israel, Greenville’s Orthodox synagogue, and describes the relationship between Beth Israel, now Conservative, and the Reform congregation, Temple of Israel.
52.
no preview
available
Jewish Heritage Collection: Oral history interview with Claire Fund
Jewish Heritage Collection: Oral history interview with Claire Fund Claire Fund recounts how her Jewish parents survived World War II. Her father Charles Fund and his sister Esther were born in Yeremsha, Poland, in the early 1900s. Charles trained as an engineer in France, joined a branch of the French Army, and ended up in Glasgow, Scotland. There he met his wife, Aurelia Frenkel of Vienna, who had escaped Austria on foot in 1939. Esther, a dentist who had returned home to practice, hid in a farmers barn for more than a year to evade the Germans. Once it was safe for her to come out of hiding, she joined the Free Czechoslovakian Army, where she met her husband, Miroslav Kerner.
53.
no preview
available
Jewish Heritage Collection: Oral history interview with Joe Engel
Jewish Heritage Collection: Oral history interview with Joe Engel Joe Engel, who was twelve years old when the Nazis occupied Poland in 1939, describes life in his home town of Zakroczym, Poland, before and after the invasion. His family fled to Warsaw and then Plonsk, the ghetto from which they were transported to concentration camps. Joe was imprisoned at Birkenau, Buna, and, Auschwitz. He made a daring escape from a train after surviving a death march. After the war ended, he immigrated to Charleston, South Carolina, where decades later his vision led to the construction of the Holocaust Memorial.
54.
no preview
available
Jewish Heritage Collection: Oral history interview with Raymond Rosenblum, Caroline Rosenblum, and Irvin
Jewish Heritage Collection: Oral history interview with Raymond Rosenblum, Caroline Rosenblum, and Irvin Rosenblum Caroline, Irvin, and Raymond Rosenblum reminisce about growing-up in Anderson, South Carolina, recalling their older siblings, relatives, neighbors, and Jewish religious observance. Their parents, Nathan and Freida Rosenblum, Polish immigrants, lived in several small South Carolina towns and Miami, Florida, before settling in Anderson in 1933. Caroline recounts her work history, and Irvin describes his eleven months in the navy at the end of World War II. Raymond served in the Naval Reserves while he attended medical school. Under the Berry Plan, his active duty was deferred until he completed his residency in urology.
55.
no preview
available
Jewish Heritage Collection: Oral history interview with Philip Garfinkel
Jewish Heritage Collection: Oral history interview with Philip Garfinkel Philip Garfinkel, one of six children of Sam and Hannah Garfinkel, natives of Divin, Russia, grew up in the 1930s and ’40s in Charleston, South Carolina. Philip discusses his siblings, friends from the St. Philip Street neighborhood, and the family’s religious practices. He fondly recalls summers on Sullivan’s Island and afternoons at the Jewish Community Center on St. Philip Street.
56.
no preview
available
Jewish Heritage Collection: Oral history interview with Caroline Geisberg Funkenstein and Louis Funkenstein
Jewish Heritage Collection: Oral history interview with Caroline Geisberg Funkenstein and Louis Funkenstein Louis Funkenstein of Athens, Georgia, married Caroline Geisberg, a native of Anderson, South Carolina, and the couple settled in Caroline’s hometown where Louis established a paper box company. The Funkensteins describe their family histories and discuss a variety of topics including religious practices and Jewish-gentile relations in Anderson.
57.
no preview
available
Jewish Heritage Collection: Oral history interview with Sandra Garfinkel Shapiro
Jewish Heritage Collection: Oral history interview with Sandra Garfinkel Shapiro Sandra Garfinkel Shapiro grew up in Charleston, South Carolina, in the 1930s and 40s, the youngest of six children of Jewish immigrants from Divin, Russia. She recalls her childhood years, including her involvement with Young Judea, the African-American woman who worked for the Garfinkel family, and her fathers mattress business. She has donated her personal collection of genealogy books, photos, and ephemera to the Jewish Heritage Collection at the College of Charleston.
58.
no preview
available
Jewish Heritage Collection: Oral history interview with Doris Lerner Baumgarten
Jewish Heritage Collection: Oral history interview with Doris Lerner Baumgarten Doris Baumgarten tells the story of how her husband, Peter, and his family escaped Vienna in 1939 after the Nazi occupation of Austria. Peter and his brother, Hans, left on the Kindertransport and were taken in at a boarding school in Bournemouth, England. Their mother worked in London as a maid, but was able to join her boys in Bournemouth when the school hired her to clean their facilities. Their father was in Sweden during the German annexation and was unable to return to Vienna because of an invalid passport. Instead, he made his way to New York, arriving in the United States a year before his wife and children.
59.
no preview
available
Jewish Heritage Collection: Oral history interview with Olga Garfinkel Weinstein
Jewish Heritage Collection: Oral history interview with Olga Garfinkel Weinstein Olga Garfinkel Weinstein, born in Charleston, South Carolina, in 1917, describes her childhood, including her siblings, the Jewish Community Center, and the traditional Jewish foods her mother served. Olga experienced no anti-Semitism as a schoolgirl, but discusses her awareness, as a young woman during World War II, of what was happening to the Jews in Europe.