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Citadel Photography Cl... (14)

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Hospital Workers' Stri... (3)
Lugo, Clarissa, 1979... (2)
White, Naomi, 1925- (2)
Darby, Joseph, 1951- (2)
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The Citadel Photograph Collection

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1.
Armand Derfner
Armand Derfner Armand Derfner (b. 1938) has practiced law for more than 40 years as a staff attorney for civil rights groups in Mississippi and Washington, DC, and in private practice in Charleston. He has helped shape the Voting Rights Act through his arguments before the US Supreme Court, and any other voting rights cases.
2.
Armand Derfner
Armand Derfner Armand Derfner (b. 1938) has practiced law for more than 40 years as a staff attorney for civil rights groups in Mississippi and Washington, DC, and in private practice in Charleston. He has helped shape the Voting Rights Act through his arguments before the US Supreme Court, and many other voting rights cases.
3.
Clarissa Lugo
Clarissa Lugo Clarissa Lugo (b. 1979) is the assistant director of admissions at The Citadel and a 2002 graduate. A native of Eagle Pass, Texas, she was a member of The Citadel’s first women’s soccer team. Lugo applied for admission after hearing of Shannon Faulkner’s unsuccessful attempt to be the college’s first female graduate.
4.
Clarissa Lugo
Clarissa Lugo Clarissa Lugo (b. 1979) is the assistant director of admissions at The Citadel and a 2002 graduate. A native of Eagle Pass, Texas, she was a member of The Citadel’s first women’s soccer team. Lugo applied for admission after hearing of Shannon Faulkner’s unsuccessful attempt to be the college’s first female graduate.
5.
Leroy Baker
Leroy Baker Leroy H. Baker, Jr. (b. 1924) served as navigator and communicator on the USS Southland during World War II. After the war, he was assigned to the Naval Receiving Station in Charleston where he helped process troop separations.
6.
Leroy Baker
Leroy Baker Leroy H. Baker, Jr. (b. 1924) served as navigator and communicator on the USS Southland during World War II. After the war, he was assigned to the Naval Receiving Station in Charleston where he helped process troop separations.
7.
Mary Moultrie
Mary Moultrie Mary Moultrie (b. 1943) was among the leaders of the 1969 Charleston hospital strike. In December of 1967, Moultrie and her coworkers at the Medical College of Charleston hospital began to complain of workplace discrimination and low wages that paid some workers less than the federal minimum wage.
8.
Mary Moultrie
Mary Moultrie Mary Moultrie (b. 1943) was among the leaders of the 1969 Charleston hospital strike. In December of 1967, Moultrie and her coworkers at the Medical College of Charleston hospital began to complain of workplace discrimination and low wages that paid some workers less than the federal minimum wage.
9.
Naomi White
Naomi White Naomi White (b. 1925) worked as a nurse at the Medical College of Charleston hospital (now MUSC) for twenty-seven years before retiring in 1985. She was among the leaders of 1969 hospital workers strike. Mass demonstrations led to mass arrests and White was among the hundreds of African Americans to be jailed for protest activities during the strike.
10.
Naomi White
Naomi White Naomi White (b. 1925) worked as a nurse at the Medical College of Charleston hospital (now MUSC) for twenty-seven years before retiring in 1985. She was among the leaders of 1969 hospital workers strike. Mass demonstrations led to mass arrests and White was among the hundreds of African Americans to be jailed for protest activities during the strike.
11.
Reverend Joseph Darby
Reverend Joseph Darby The Rev. Joseph Darby (b. 1951) is the Senior Pastor of Morris Brown A.M.E. Church in Charleston, and has long been involved in racial, cultural and faith-based programs to improve South Carolina race relations and education. During an interview regarding the 2008 Democratic primary in South Carolina, Darby observed that some supporters of Barack Obama’s campaign have been disappointed by the tentativeness of his presidency.
12.
Reverend Joseph Darby
Reverend Joseph Darby The Rev. Joseph Darby (b. 1951) is the Senior Pastor of Morris Brown A.M.E. Church in Charleston, and has long been involved in racial, cultural and faith-based programs to improve South Carolina race relations and education. During an interview regarding the 2008 Democratic primary in South Carolina, Darby observed that some supporters of Barack Obama’s campaign have been disappointed by the tentativeness of his presidency.
13.
William Lindsay Koob III
William Lindsay Koob III William Lindsay Koob III (b. 1946) is a Citadel graduate (1968) who served fourteen years in US Army Intelligence, rising to the rank of Major. In 1987, while stationed at the Pentagon, he admitted under interrogation to being a homosexual and was forced to resign his commission rather than risk a messy investigation and a less-than-honorable discharge (this happened in the days before "Don't ask, don't tell.") A short time later, he came out to his parents and brother (also a Citadel grad) during a visit back home: “I told the whole story, and by the time I finished, I was in tears. My brother made a few supportive comments -- then, everyone sat and waited for a response from my father: the retired Army Colonel. There I was: the third generation of my family to serve in the military. But, my Dad just kind of sat there, looking down at the table. After awhile, he got up from the table, walked around to my seat ... and he pulled me to my feet, hugged me warmly, and said, ‘Son, I don't like it, I don't understand it, and I’m going to have to think about this for a long time ... but you're my son and I love you.’ Could I have asked for anything more? No.” Koob further reported that his Citadel classmates, following the leadership of their former cadet company commander, have been accepting of his homosexuality: “I am still one of the brotherhood," he said. "And, for that, I will be eternally grateful.” (Koob, Interview by Kerry Taylor 26 February and 24 April 2010). These days, Lindsay (known as "Bill" during his Citadel years) maintains his thriving "retirement career" as probably the only internationally-respected classical music critic and journalist to ever graduate from The Citadel.
14.
William Lindsay Koob III
William Lindsay Koob III William Lindsay Koob III (b. 1946) is a Citadel graduate (1968) who served fourteen years in US Army Intelligence, rising to the rank of Major. In 1987, while stationed at the Pentagon, he admitted under interrogation to being a homosexual and was forced to resign his commission rather than risk a messy investigation and a less-than-honorable discharge (this happened in the days before "Don't ask, don't tell.") A short time later, he came out to his parents and brother (also a Citadel grad) during a visit back home: “I told the whole story, and by the time I finished, I was in tears. My brother made a few supportive comments -- then, everyone sat and waited for a response from my father: the retired Army Colonel. There I was: the third generation of my family to serve in the military. But, my Dad just kind of sat there, looking down at the table. After awhile, he got up from the table, walked around to my seat ... and he pulled me to my feet, hugged me warmly, and said, ‘Son, I don't like it, I don't understand it, and I’m going to have to think about this for a long time ... but you're my son and I love you.’ Could I have asked for anything more? No.” Koob further reported that his Citadel classmates, following the leadership of their former cadet company commander, have been accepting of his homosexuality: “I am still one of the brotherhood," he said. "And, for that, I will be eternally grateful.” (Koob, Interview by Kerry Taylor 26 February and 24 April 2010). These days, Lindsay (known as "Bill" during his Citadel years) maintains his thriving "retirement career" as probably the only internationally-respected classical music critic and journalist to ever graduate from The Citadel.