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Avery Research Center Artifact Collection

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1.
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Lady Ann (Kenya)
Lady Ann (Kenya) Smoothly finished art pottery piece with predominantly orange and green coloration. Contains a decorative jar and stopper.
2.
Ku Klux Klan whip
Ku Klux Klan whip Ku Klux Klan whip with "KKK" burned into wooden handle. Whip is made of a heavy material belt. Purchased in Starke, Florida.
3.
Wrist shackles
Wrist shackles Set of iron wrist shackles with two D-shaped cuffs, one containing a pin lock and the other with overlapping links. Origin South Carolina.
4.
Glass chicken egg
Glass chicken egg Glass chicken egg used for inducing hens to lay eggs. According to Mrs. Gold, to encourage a hen to lay eggs in a specific place, farmers would often begin making their nests and place the artificial nesting eggs in them with the hope that the hen would complete her nest in that location. This also helped the farmer keep track of which hens were laying eggs and where the eggs were located. The glass eggs remained in the nest until the hen laid and incubated the eggs and the offspring hatched. It was important to maintain this process and promptly remove the artificial egg so that it could be reused.
5.
Glass turkey egg
Glass turkey egg A glass turkey egg used to encourage turkey hens to lay eggs in a particular location. According to Mrs. Gold, to encourage a hen to lay eggs in a specific place, farmers would often begin making their nests and place the artificial nesting eggs in them with the hope that the hen would complete her nest in that location. This also helped the farmer keep track of which hens were laying eggs and where the eggs were located. The glass eggs remained in the nest until the hen laid and incubated the eggs and the offspring hatched. It was important to maintain this process and promptly remove the artificial egg so that it could be reused.
6.
Wrought iron
Wrought iron Snake-shaped wrought iron art object. The eyes are painted red and there are gold painted markings on the body. Forged by Carlton Simmons, Charleston, South Carolina.
7.
Wrought iron
Wrought iron Wrought iron art object with a forked end and twisted iron decorations. Forged by Carlton Simmons, Charleston, South Carolina.
8.
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Slave-made chair
Slave-made chair Chair made by slaves from Ridgley Plantation near Florence, South Carolina. The chair is made with mortise and tenon joints reinforced with square nails. The seat is of animal skin. Evidence that the legs of the chair have been shortened indicates that it was a slave's chair. Slaves were not permitted to sit higher than the master or his children.
9.
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Slave auctioneer's token
Slave auctioneer's token Slave auctioneer's token, 1846. These tokens were distributed as one-cent pieces and served as advertisements for the businesses and services depicted on the coins.
10.
Currency
Currency One dollar bill issued by the Bank of South Carolina, payable on demand at their office in Charleston.
11.
Mortar and pestle
Mortar and pestle Iron mortar and pestle from Lincolnville, South Carolina. According to Mrs. Gold, a local store owner grew the peanuts, shucked them, and made peanut butter with this mortar and pestle to sell in his store.
12.
Currency
Currency Five dollar bill issued by the Farmers & Exchange Bank of Charleston and dated September 28, 1853. Bill depicts an African American tending to a wagon pulled by oxen. Engraved by Toppan, Carpenter, Kasilear & Company, Philadelphia and New York.
13.
Slave badge
Slave badge Pewter slave badge produced for a servant in Charleston, S.C. It was common to counterfeit badges to avoid paying taxes, and this particular one was not issued by the city, but created in the stamped year. The face is stamped "Charleston 1862 Servant #4." Back side contains no markings.
14.
Slave badge
Slave badge Copper slave badge, square in shape. Face is stamped "Charleston No. 136 Mechanic 1833."
15.
Slave badge
Slave badge Copper slave badge, square in shape. Face is stamped "Charleston 1840 Servant 1869." 1840 is the year produced and 1869 signifies that it was the 1,869th "servant" badge sold that year.
16.
Slave badge
Slave badge Copper slave badge, square in shape. Face is stamped "Charleston 1847 Servant 1004."
17.
Slave badge
Slave badge Copper slave badge, square in shape, reading "Charleston 1845 Servant 1165."
18.
Slave badge
Slave badge Copper slave badge, square in shape, reading "Charleston 1851 Mechanic 74."
19.
Slave badge
Slave badge Copper slave badge imprinted "Charleston No. 261 Fruiterer 1812." The badge is a contemporary counterfeit -- "Fruiterer" is not a known occupation to be printed upon slave badges.
20.
Slave badge
Slave badge Copper slave badge, square in shape, reading "Charleston 20 Servant 1823." Under the date, a stamp reads "LAFA," signifying the maker, John Joseph Lafar.