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Journals, Diaries and Travelogues

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Charles Fraser Book of Precedents, 1800-1819
Charles Fraser Book of Precedents, 1800-1819 Charles Fraser (1782-1860) was a lifelong resident of Charleston, South Carolina and a renowned artist known primarily for his miniatures of fellow Charlestonians. Starting in 1798, before delving full time into his art, Fraser studied law under John Julius Pringle, Charles Cotesworth Pinckney and others, and was admitted to the bar in 1806. This Book of Precedents was apparently written by Fraser as a reference work for his legal studies. Compiled mostly from 1800 -1807, the book contains copies of writs, pleas and judgments and includes cases adjudicated from 1736-1819, almost all of which were heard in Charleston district courts. "Part First" contains writs and decisions. "Part Second" contains pleas, judgments and executions. Full text in progress. Indexed. 242p.
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David Henry Mordecai Travel Diary (1849)
David Henry Mordecai Travel Diary (1849) Diary of David Henry Mordecai's trip down east coast to Florida Keys, description of town, wreckers, drunkenness of Key West; description of Havana, and Mantanzas, Cuba. Also has notes on school subjects, reflections on various topics, notation of "Jews - the persecuted race," slavery in SC, pressed botanic specimens, details of weather first quarter of 1850, maps and drawings.
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David Henry Mordecai Travel Diary (1850)
David Henry Mordecai Travel Diary (1850) Fragments and narratives describing cities visited, often with notations re principal industries, amusements, transportation, etc. Cities visited include Paris, Ghent, Frankfurt, London, Liverpool, Sheffield, & Birmingham.
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David Henry Mordecai Travel Diary (1856-57)
David Henry Mordecai Travel Diary (1856-57) Record of David Henry Mordecai's illnesses and schooling, mostly in Heidelberg, Germany, with some notations at Ems. With sporadic notations of weather, and mentions of South Carolinians Albert Rhett, William, John & Alfred Preston, Charles Boyd, Hammond, Legare, D.C. Seixas & others. References to museums, artwork and plays seen. Mentions of health and cures, the need for an operation (p. 73); stupidity of peasants vs. slaves (18); lynching (21), political situation in Kansas (30); doomed nature of American slavery (31); inevitability of Civil War (31-2); state support of SC College (56-57); women who "paint" their faces (111). With constant references to family, and some financial jottings. Some entries in German.
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David Henry Mordecai Travel Diary (1857-58)
David Henry Mordecai Travel Diary (1857-58) David Henry Mordecai's 1857 diary contains details of a trip through Turin, Milan, Venice, Vienna, Heidelberg, etc with frequent references to artists and specific works seen in Museums. A flare up of consumption triggers change of plans; before embarking for Egypt, he mentions various Charleston friends including Rhetts, Middletons, Prestons and Hamptons, trips to the opera and a life-changing event not described. With botanic specimens and notations in rear of book.
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Diary of a Voyage to China, 1850-1851
Diary of a Voyage to China, 1850-1851 From 1850 to 1851, Thomas Small captained the English merchant ship "Robert Small" on his 11th voyage to China and the East. In this private diary, Captain Small reveals the intense loneliness of command and details the longing he feels for the wife and newborn son he left behind. He comments on marriage, child-rearing, and religion, and frequently expresses his desire to find employment "ashore" to better provide for his family. In addition to these personal entries, he provides rich details of a mid-nineteenth century life at sea. Daily nautical annotations are augmented with comments about the crew, rations, frequent communications with passing ships, and his waning hope in obtaining a profitable cargo of tea in China. 126 pages. Full text.
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Elizabeth Allston Pringle Writings
Elizabeth Allston Pringle Writings Elizabeth Waties Allston Pringle (1845-1921) was the daughter of South Carolina Governor Robert F.W. Allston (1801-1864). She married John Julius Pringle (1842-1876) in 1870 and lived at White House Plantation in Georgetown County, SC. Widowed at thirty-one, she moved to the Allston family plantation, Chicora Wood, to help her mother, Adele P. Allston, care for her widowed brother's children. She was the author of "A Woman Rice Planter" and "Chronicles of Chicora Wood." This collection consists of five separate manuscripts: (1) Partial draft of a chapter ("Baby Woes") from "Chronicles of Chicora Wood." (2) A story entitled "The Innocents at Home and the Furniture Fiend Abroad" written under her pen name, Patience Pennington, and intended to be the first in a series of "Peaceville Happenings." (3) A story entitled "My Dogs" for a projected series of "Plantation Sketches." (4) An incomplete rough draft of an untitled short story about Pompey Green and his disobedient wife Doll. (5) Miscellaneous notes on owners of plantations on the Pee Dee, Waccamaw and Black Rivers, with the fullest notes on White House Plantation.
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Frank Fisher Notes, 1882-1902
Frank Fisher Notes, 1882-1902 Frank R. Fisher's notes contain observations, drawings, and photographs relating to scientific studies, particularly astronomical observations made while Fisher was a resident in Charleston, S.C., during the 1880s. Fisher, a cashier at the South Carolina Railroad Company in Charleston, was an amateur scientist and inventor who occasionally worked in consultation with longtime College of Charleston professor Lewis R. Gibbes. Fisher's astronomical observations begin in Charleston in 1882 with the sighting of a comet. He also records his observations of the transit of Venus (1883), an aurora and sun spots (1892), and discusses new theories concerning Jupiter (1894) and the nature of the sun's corona (1892). He includes charts, drawings, and diagrams. Of particular interest are observations made during the Charleston earthquake in Aug. 1886 (pages 41-73). Other notes include inscriptions from buildings in Nineveh, Hebrew alphabets, the "hieroglyphic alphabet" and discussions on the Rosetta Stone and the statue of Memnon at Thebes. 123p. Full text.
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Hortensia Mordecai Travel Diary (1859)
Hortensia Mordecai Travel Diary (1859) Nearly daily journal of travel through Nice, Monaco, Genoa, Leghorn, Rome (where she visited Harriet Hosmer and other sculptors’ studios), Pompeii and Herculaneum, Florence, Mantua, Milan, Venice, Trieste (glimpsing Emperor Franz Joseph III), Dresden, Leipzig, Berlin and Paris, where the family stayed. Just after the family left Italy, the second war for Italian independence broke out, and she mentions Austrian troop movements and her sympathies for the Italian side. In Paris, she mentions Ransom Calhoun & Mr. Preston, Mr. Ogier, Dr. Horlbeck & family, "Miss Lewis, the poetess," Boston Editor Bigelow, and Senator Charles Sumner, with an allusion to his caning by Preston Brooks; with visit to a synagogue. Frequent references to beggars, family members, and detailed descriptions of artwork seen and admired. Diary begins very soon after the death of her brother, David Henry Mordecai, and she often references her sadness over the loss.
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J. F. R. Papers, 1849-1855
J. F. R. Papers, 1849-1855 Papers include a handwritten journal, school exercises, and lecture notes written by an unnamed author with the initials J. F. R. The author was a Physician who apparently attended medical lectures at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia (1849-1850) and University of Louisiana in New Orleans. He briefly served as medical officer on the steamer Falcon in the Caribbean (1853) and as medical officer at the military asylum at East Pascagoula, Mississippi (1854-1855).
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Joseph Lyons Diary (1833-1834)
Joseph Lyons Diary (1833-1834) Entries recall finishing SC College, attending parties in Charleston, visiting many Jewish families, mentioning Penina Moise, travelling to Philadelphia, seeing Fanny Kemble & comparing Philadelphia & Charleston women. In Savannah, he studies law, comments on readings and writers, muses on atheism, observances of Jewish holidays and Sabbath, possibility of becoming Hazzan, his poor eyesight and health, his poetry and other topics. After a brief trip to Grahamsville, Purrysburg, Coosawatchie & Pocotaligo, he mentions nullification, Aaron Burr, goes to Effingham County for health, and returns to Charleston. Published in Memoirs of American Jews. Later entries re Civil War era movements of troops.
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Journal of Charles Cotesworth Pinckney's plantations, 1818-1819
Journal of Charles Cotesworth Pinckney's plantations, 1818-1819 Journal entries on pages interleaved in Hoff's Agricultural Almanac (1818). Includes personal and plantation entries by Charles Cotesworth Pinckney (1818 April 6-May 16, with a few scattered entries in late 1818 and early 1819). The journal records daily activities on Pinckney's plantation. Pinckney not only planted cotton, sweet potatoes, Irish potatoes, corn, and oats, but relied heavily on fish for food. Many daily entries record the number of drumfish caught and the share of the catch (and other items) distributed to slaves. Other entries concern milk cows and curing meat. Several pages of the journal contain a list of slaves at "The Crescent," "the old Place," "the Point," and Pinckney Island.
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Roswell T. Logan Journal, 1852-1865
Roswell T. Logan Journal, 1852-1865 Roswell Turner Logan was born in Charleston, SC, in 1836 and graduated from Charleston College in 1855. After serving in the Confederate Calvary for four years, he returned to Charleston in 1866 and began a lengthy newspaper career, including a stint as telegraph editor for the Charleston newspaper, The News and Courier. Logan's bound journal begins in 1852 with an address before his Charleston High School debate club, the Philomathic Society. Among the many speeches, poems and essays included in the journal are three essays published in the Charleston College Magazine: "Mohammed and His religion" and "College life" in the April 1855 issue and "Goodbye" in May 1855. Poems include a requiem to Logan's old horse John Randolph and a commentary on the contentious election of 1860 titled "The Presidential canvas of 1860." In his last dated entry, July 11th, 1865, Logan says goodbye to his beloved journal with the poem "Farewell to this Book." 99p. Full text.
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