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Holocaust Archives Project

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Willy Adler Collection
Willy Adler Collection This collection contains three photographs of Willy Adler and his parents, Max and Berta Adler, all taken in Hamburg, Germany. The first photograph is a portrait of Willy Adler's parents, Max and Berta Adler taken approximately 1920. The second photograph, ca. 1927, depicts Willy Adler's 2nd grade class at the Talmud Torah Realschule. The third photograph is a family portrait taken in 1936 or 1937 of Willy, Berta and Max Adler. In addition to these scanned photographs, the library has black and white photocopies of several original documents returned to the lender. Among the photocopies are two related business flyers, one dated 1927 announcing a change of address and the other, dated March 1, 1938, announcing that the business was sold and "now in Aryan hands." Other photocopies in the collection include a marriage license for Beila Teller (bride) and Aron Mordko Adler (groom), a tax receipt for a business dated November 1937, a pamphlet published in Hamburg in 1983 about Willy Adler's childhood rabbi titled "Oberrabbiner Dr. Joseph Carlebach, 1883-1942" and pages, with loose translation, of Willy Adler's "Chumash."
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Pincus Kolender Collection
Pincus Kolender Collection The Pincus Kolender collection consists of 7 prewar and 13 postwar photographs of the families of Pincus Kolender and his wife Renee Kolender (nee Fuchs). As a young teen Pincus spent several years in the Jewish ghetto in his hometown of Bochnia, Poland. While there he witnessed the execution of his mother, Rachel, by German soldiers and the deportation of his sister, Rose, to Treblinka. When the ghetto was completely liquidated in 1943, Pincus and his brother, Avrum, were sent to Auschwitz and his father, Chiel, to Plashov (where he was executed). Pincus would eventually escape from a cattle car during an Allied bombing raid in late April, 1945, during one of many forced migrations westward by the German army. He lost track of his brother during the first of these death marches in January, 1945, and his exact fate remains unknown. Renee Kolender was forced into labor during the war and spent time in ammunition factories in Skarzysko and Czestochowa, Poland. She was liberated when Czestochowa was overrun by the Red Army in January, 1945. In addition to the photographs, a copy of a testimonial by Pincus Kolender about life in the Bochnia ghetto is included.
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Martha Bauer Collection
Martha Bauer Collection This collection contains photographs of family members of Felix Bauer and Martha Bauer (nee Mondschein). Unknown to one another, Felix Bauer and Martha Mondschein independently fled Europe and immigrated to the Dominican Republic, where they eventually met and married in 1943. Despite separate attempts to secure visas for family members left behind, most of the people depicted in these photographs perished in the Holocaust. Included are photographs of Martha Bauer's aunt and uncle, Adolf and Mathilde Mondschein, her sister and brother, Claire and Rene Mondschein and Felix Bauer's parents, Rudolf and Risa Bauer. Also included is a 1940 telegram sent to Felix Bauer in the Dominican Republic concerning his parents and a 1946 memo sent to Martha Bauer from the Union of Jewish Communities of 'Yougoslavia' detailing the fate of her brother. A 2000 letter from Martha Bauer to Eileen Chepenik is included that briefly mentions the death of Felix Bauer's parents in Auschwitz and the unknown fate of her aunt and uncle.
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Joe Engel Collection
Joe Engel Collection A collection of 2 prewar and 11 postwar photographs mainly depicting Joe Engel and family. Joe Engel (b.1927, Zakroczym, Poland) was arrested in the Plonsk ghetto in 1942 and sent to Auschwitz in August or September of that year. In January 1945 he would take part in the death march out of Auschwitz when the Germans hurriedly evacuated the camps as the Soviet army approached. During one of these forced marches westward, Joe Engel escaped from a cattle car and was eventually liberated by the Soviets. The first two photographs are of Joe and family members in prewar Poland. The third photograph depicts Joe and some family members reunited in Zakroczym in May 1945, one month after liberation. The next six photographs depict Joe Engel and others during their stay at the postwar refugee camp in Zeilsheim (Salzheim) near Frankfurt, Germany. The tenth photograph, of unknown origin, is a snapshot of a postwar advertisement that depicts a young child seeking her relatives. The eleventh and twelfth photographs depict Joe in Charleston, South Carolina at his aunt Bessie's house in the late 1940's and 1950's. The last photograph is of Joe, his sister and uncle, taken in Netanya, Israel in the 1970's.
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Harry and Erika Blas Collection
Harry and Erika Blas Collection A collection of 18 black and white and 2 color slides depicting the family of Harry (Herzl/Herschel) Blas (Blass) and Erika Blas (nee Stockfleth). Includes a short personal narrative by Harry Blas chronicling his young adulthood under German occupation in Lodz, Poland; his imprisonment in Auschwitz and eventual liberation; his search for missing family members in Europe after the war; his marriage to Erika in 1951 and their immigration to the United States in 1952. Also includes a brief handwritten genealogy of Erika Blas. The first photographic image (1910), depicts the grandparents of Harry Blas. The second photograph (1917?), shows the immediate family of Harry Blas. The third photograph (1929) depicts the immediate family of Erika Stockfleth (Blas). The fourth and fifth photographs (1931) are of Erika, her sister and great grandmother. Photograph number six (1917) is a picture of Erika's mother from an identification photo. The seventh photograph depicts Harry and a friend (1946). Photograph number eight (n.d.) is a picture of Harry alone. The ninth photograph (1951) depicts Harry and Erika with friends at their prenuptial party. The tenth photograph is a wedding picture of Harry and Erika (1951). The eleventh photograph is a photo of Harry and Erika's newborn, Susan (1961). The twelfth photograph (ca. 1980), shows Harry with his daughter and brother. The remaining eight photographs are not definitively identified. The first four text images are Harry Blas' personal narrative and the fifth text image is Erika Blas' handwritten genealogy.
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Charles C. Cross Collection
Charles C. Cross Collection A collection of nine black and white photographs and relating to the Buchenwald Concentration Camp, established in Nazi Germany in 1937 and liberated by the allies on April 11, 1945. The photographs were taken or collected in April and May 1945 by Charles C. Cross, a corporal in the 807th Medical Air Evacuation. The first photograph (April 1945) depicts a boy standing between two freed inmates. The second photograph (April 1945) shows a gallows with a pile of human ashes in the background. The third photograph (ca. May 1945) documents a monument erected to commemorate the victims of Nazi violence. In the fourth photograph (April 1945) an SS General is being returned to the scene of the crimes. The fifth photograph (April 1945) records living conditions at Buchenwald, including sewage drainage. In the sixth photograph (April 1945) medical workers are picking up the bodies of inmates who had died. The seventh photograph (April 1945) depicts the entrance to the ovens. In the eighth photograph (April 1945) dead prisoners are stacked like cordwood awaiting cremation. The ninth photograph (April 1945) shows healthier inmates at Buchenwald.
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1. Mementoes of Days in Service, 17 Jun 41 - 12 Dec 45
1. Mementoes of Days in Service, 17 Jun 41 - 12 Dec 45 "Mementoes of Days in Service" details Lawrence Layden's service in World War II from his induction in June 1941, six months before Pearl Harbor, until his formal discharge in December, 1945. Part of the 67th Tactical Reconnaissance Group, Layden's squadron provided aerial reconnaissance for Operation Overlord and the assault on Nazi Germany. Through photos and text, Layden's scrapbook follows him from his initial assignment in Louisville, Kentucky to bases in England and continental Europe. The album contains reconnaissance photos used in the assault on Europe, photographs of Layden at various bases throughout the war and several photographs of Buchenwald concentration camp, visited by Layden six days after its liberation.
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