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Lynch Family Letters, 1858-1866

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181.
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268. Anna Lynch to Bp Patrick Lynch -- February 25, 1863
268. Anna Lynch to Bp Patrick Lynch -- February 25, 1863 Letter from Anna Lynch to Bishop Patrick Lynch asking him to inquire about a Mr. Laughlin who left Cheraw on assignment to a Confederate arsenal but has not been heard of since. 1p.
182.
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267. Madame Baptiste to Bp Patrick Lynch -- February 19, 1863
267. Madame Baptiste to Bp Patrick Lynch -- February 19, 1863 Letter from Madame Baptiste to Bishop Patrick Lynch detailing her fears of an imminent attack on Charleston. She writes that if the Bishop "should get even a scratch" she would be at his side but later admits that "I respect too much our rule of cloister to think of going without necessity." 4p.
183.
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266. Madame Baptiste to Bp Patrick Lynch -- February 14, 1863
266. Madame Baptiste to Bp Patrick Lynch -- February 14, 1863 Madame Baptiste writes to Bishop Patrick Lynch about news at the Ursuline Convent and Academy. She mentions that the Bishop's slave, Isaac, who has been working at the Convent, has asked that his children be moved to Mr. Kitt's place, recently acquired by the Bishop, so that he could see them more easily. 4p.
184.
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265. Anna Lynch to Bp Patrick Lynch -- February 12, 1863
265. Anna Lynch to Bp Patrick Lynch -- February 12, 1863 Letter from Anna Lynch to Bishop Patrick Lynch with news on the health of the family in Cheraw. 2p.
185.
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264. Madame Baptiste to Bp Patrick Lynch -- February 5, 1863
264. Madame Baptiste to Bp Patrick Lynch -- February 5, 1863 Madame Baptiste writes to Bishop Patrick Lynch about her concerns over the war. She has heard that the British Consul in Charleston intends to leave and fears it is in anticipation of a Union attack. She recounts the story of a Catholic saint who, in a time of war, was able to summon a storm of gnats to disrupt the horses of the enemy and asks the Bishop, "can you not do something like that for Charleston?" She also asks the Bishop about investments, fearing that the Confederate currency might one day be worthless. 2p.
186.
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263. John Lynch to Bp Patrick Lynch -- February 2, 1863
263. John Lynch to Bp Patrick Lynch -- February 2, 1863 Letter from John Lynch to Bishop Patrick Lynch concerning news about the Bishop's properties. John writes that the Lexington plantation continues to be a financial burden and hints at turmoil at the Bishop's Lancaster farm. Several slaves have been brought to Columbia from Lancaster and John suggests to the Bishop to sell them for a profit stating that "I saw some sold here today at pretty good prices." 2p.
187.
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262. Madame Baptiste to Bp Patrick Lynch -- January 28, 1863
262. Madame Baptiste to Bp Patrick Lynch -- January 28, 1863 Letter from Madame Lynch to Bishop Patrick Lynch touching on a variety of topics. She writes of acquiring a piano and "Erhard" harp for the community and muses at length at why there have been no attempts at peace with "Napoleon (III) mediating now." She mentions inoculating the children at the academy for smallpox and describes an awful barrel of flour the Bishop had sent to Columbia. She tells of the horrible condition of the "negroes" in Lancaster writing, "I never have patience with the yankees, except when I think of the abolition of slavery." 8p.
188.
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261. Madame Baptiste to Bp Patrick Lynch -- January 26, 1863
261. Madame Baptiste to Bp Patrick Lynch -- January 26, 1863 Madame Baptiste writes to Bishop Patrick Lynch with updates on the number of boarders at the academy and relates how one potential boarder from Georgetown has been denied passage by the Yankees. 2p.
189.
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260. Henrietta Lynch to Bp Patrick Lynch -- January 14, 1863
260. Henrietta Lynch to Bp Patrick Lynch -- January 14, 1863 Henrietta Lynch writes to Bishop Patrick Lynch for advice on how to inform "Mrs. Posi" that her husband has been put in prison by "Garibaldi." 1p.
190.
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259. Madame Baptiste to Bp Patrick Lynch -- January 13, 1863
259. Madame Baptiste to Bp Patrick Lynch -- January 13, 1863 Madame Baptiste writes to Bishop Patrick Lynch with updates on boarders at the academy and asks the Bishop to inquire if Mother Theresa, of the Sisters of Mercy in Charleston, has space for three "half orphans." 2p.
191.
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258. Francis Lynch to Bp Patrick Lynch -- January 10, 1863
258. Francis Lynch to Bp Patrick Lynch -- January 10, 1863 Letter from Francis Lynch to Bishop Patrick Lynch concerning a delay in weighing a load of cotton. The payment for the cotton would help Francis cover a recent draft made on the Bishop's account. 1p.
192.
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257. Bank Draft of Francis Lynch -- January 9, 1863
257. Bank Draft of Francis Lynch -- January 9, 1863 Bank Draft from the Merchants' Bank of South Carolina in Cheraw by Francis Lynch on Bishop Patrick Lynch for $80,000. 1p.
193.
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256. Madame Baptiste to Bp Patrick Lynch -- January 2, 1863
256. Madame Baptiste to Bp Patrick Lynch -- January 2, 1863 Letter from Madame Baptiste to Bp Patrick Lynch informing him that a Mrs. Cohen would like to see him regarding an issue with her husband, a recently paroled prisoner of war. Madame Baptiste also boasts of the continued numbers of boarders being welcomed to the school but notes that one of the parents believe "our school will stand a poor chance when peace is proclaimed." 4p.
194.
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255. Francis Lynch to Bp Patrick Lynch -- December 16, 1862
255. Francis Lynch to Bp Patrick Lynch -- December 16, 1862 Letter from Francis Lynch to Bishop Patrick Lynch asking the Bishop to direct the bearer of his letter, Mr. Casey, to the British Consul in Charleston. Mr. Casey, an employee of Francis, seeks the protection of the Consul because, as Francis writes, he "seems to have no love for fighting, as a common labourer I have no right to apply for his exemption." 1p.
195.
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254. Francis Lynch to Bp Patrick Lynch -- December 15, 1862
254. Francis Lynch to Bp Patrick Lynch -- December 15, 1862 Francis Lynch writes to Bishop Patrick Lynch offering to buy several slave "families" from him to work some newly acquired land. 1p.
196.
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253. Madame Baptiste to Bp Patrick Lynch -- December 15, 1862
253. Madame Baptiste to Bp Patrick Lynch -- December 15, 1862 Letter from Madame Baptiste to Bishop Patrick Lynch with news from the Ursuline Convent and Academy. 4p.
197.
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252. Louisa Blain to Bp Patrick Lynch -- December 6, 1862
252. Louisa Blain to Bp Patrick Lynch -- December 6, 1862 Louisa Blain writes to Bishop Patrick Lynch about her hopes that the Bishop will soon visit Cheraw. 3p.
198.
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251. Madame Baptiste to Bp Patrick Lynch -- November 25, 1862
251. Madame Baptiste to Bp Patrick Lynch -- November 25, 1862 Letter from Madame Baptiste to Bishop Patrick Lynch with updates from the Ursuline Convent and Academy. 2p.
199.
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250. Hugh Lynch to Bp Patrick Lynch -- November 24, 1862
250. Hugh Lynch to Bp Patrick Lynch -- November 24, 1862 Hugh Lynch writes to Bishop Patrick Lynch about the illness that has sent him home to Cheraw from Charleston and news of their brother, Francis, who has gone to see the governor of North Carolina concerning an embargo that has prevented him from getting supplies from his business yard there. 2p.
200.
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249. John Lynch to Bp Patrick Lynch -- November 20, 1862
249. John Lynch to Bp Patrick Lynch -- November 20, 1862 Letter from John Lynch to Bp Patrick Lynch with updates on the Bishop's plantations and news of a large contract for shoes that their brother, Francis, has been awarded by the "central association." To help fulfill the contract Francis has "purchased a negro boy (shoemaker) 16 years old for thirteen hundred dollars." 2p.
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