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Heyward and Ferguson Family Papers, 1806-1923

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81.
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079. William Henry Heyward to James B. Heyward -- December 9th, 1844
079. William Henry Heyward to James B. Heyward -- December 9th, 1844 William Henry Heyward writes to James B. Heyward from Columbia relating the work of the South Carolina General Assembly and the election of Governor Aiken, and mentions that he has heard that "our good citizens of Charleston came very near lynching" the agent from Massachusetts. 3p.
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080. Nathaniel Heyward to James B. Heyward -- December 13, 1844
080. Nathaniel Heyward to James B. Heyward -- December 13, 1844 Letter from Nathaniel Heyward at Combahee to his grandson James B. Heyward. Nathaniel mentions a cargo of rice he is sending to Ladson and Co., the disappointing rice crop, and a broken water wheel shaft at Rose Hill plantation that "stops all our pounding at No. 6 & 7 for this winter." 2p.
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081. Samuel Wragg Ferguson to F.R. Barker (Godmother) -- November 2 (ca. 1855)
081. Samuel Wragg Ferguson to F.R. Barker (Godmother) -- November 2 (ca. 1855) Samuel Wragg Ferguson writes to his godmother about news from West Point. He mentions a fire on Crow's Nest mountain, the dull routine of West Point and his eagerness for his June furlough. 5p.
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082. Samuel Wragg Ferguson to F.R. Barker (Godmother) -- December 6 (ca. 1855)
082. Samuel Wragg Ferguson to F.R. Barker (Godmother) -- December 6 (ca. 1855) Letter from Samuel Wragg Ferguson from West Point to his godmother. He writes about the mild winter at West Point this season, a rash of recent cadet accidents and his longing to be "warmed by a Dockon fire." 5p.
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083. Samuel Wragg Ferguson to F.R. Barker (Godmother) -- November 13, 1855
083. Samuel Wragg Ferguson to F.R. Barker (Godmother) -- November 13, 1855 Letter from Samuel Wragg Ferguson from West Point to his godmother. Ferguson writes about his studies in philosophy and chemistry and relates an amusing tale of a friend visiting overnight who had to hide under his bed during a surprise inspection. He mentions that he has read that Professor Miles was elected mayor of Charleston and hopes that "he will keep the streets a little cleaner" and "will have the battery repaired." 5p.
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084. Samuel Wragg Ferguson to F.R. Barker (Godmother) -- August 31st, (ca. 1855)
084. Samuel Wragg Ferguson to F.R. Barker (Godmother) -- August 31st, (ca. 1855) Letter from Samuel Wragg Ferguson from West Point to his godmother relating a recent visit from his family. 4p.
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085. Samuel Wragg Ferguson to F.R. Barker (Godmother) -- July 9th, 1854
085. Samuel Wragg Ferguson to F.R. Barker (Godmother) -- July 9th, 1854 Letter from Samuel Wragg Ferguson from West Point to his godmother. Ferguson writes from a summer encampment that the furlough of the chaplain has delighted the cadets and given him time to write. He mentions the departure of the ill-liked commandant of cadets, Bob Garnett, writing "come who may he cannot be worse." 5p.
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086. Samuel Wragg Ferguson to F.R. Barker (Godmother) -- May 19th (ca. 1855)
086. Samuel Wragg Ferguson to F.R. Barker (Godmother) -- May 19th (ca. 1855) Letter from Samuel Wragg Ferguson from West Point to his godmother writing about a recent visit of relatives. He also mentions that he is looking forward to summer encampment and "no more study for two months." 3p.
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087. Samuel Wragg Ferguson to F.R. Barker (Godmother) -- September 3rd, 1852
087. Samuel Wragg Ferguson to F.R. Barker (Godmother) -- September 3rd, 1852 Letter from Samuel Wragg Ferguson from West Point to his godmother. Ferguson writes about being "drilled half to death to show off before General Scott" and comments on some of his fellow cadets. 4p.
90.
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088. Samuel Wragg Ferguson to F.R. Barker (Godmother) -- February 22nd, 1854
088. Samuel Wragg Ferguson to F.R. Barker (Godmother) -- February 22nd, 1854 Letter from Samuel Wragg Ferguson from West Point to his godmother. Ferguson writes about a fight he has gotten into with another cadet and is "sorry to say that I am in arrest again." 2p.
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089. Samuel Wragg Ferguson to F.R. Barker (Godmother) -- November 10th, 1854
089. Samuel Wragg Ferguson to F.R. Barker (Godmother) -- November 10th, 1854 Letter from Samuel Wragg Ferguson from West Point to his godmother. Ferguson requests a long list of articles to be sent to him and writes that he is in debt to the school and unable to get anything from the commissary. 6p.
92.
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090. Samuel Wragg Ferguson to F.R. Barker (Godmother) -- November 22nd (ca. 1855)
090. Samuel Wragg Ferguson to F.R. Barker (Godmother) -- November 22nd (ca. 1855) Letter from Samuel Wragg Ferguson from West Point to his godmother. Ferguson writes about being transferred to Company A and "is now in the clutches of Lt. Nelson commonly known as fossil remains." He relates about failing his first inspection with the new commander "as an introduction to the Co." 4p.
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091. Samuel Wragg Ferguson to F.R. Barker (Godmother) -- September 6th, 1855
091. Samuel Wragg Ferguson to F.R. Barker (Godmother) -- September 6th, 1855 Letter from Samuel Wragg Ferguson from West Point to his godmother. Ferguson writes about finally settling in after his furlough and the pleasant time he had flirting with the girls before his drills and studies began, claiming "had I been in the neighborhood of Charleston people would have had me married a dozen times." 3p.
94.
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092. Samuel Wragg Ferguson to F.R. Barker (Godmother) -- March 12th, 1856
092. Samuel Wragg Ferguson to F.R. Barker (Godmother) -- March 12th, 1856 Letter from Samuel Wragg Ferguson from West Point to his godmother. Ferguson inquires about friends and family and relates his daily struggles with his "poor old overcoat." 3p.
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093. Samuel Wragg Ferguson to Fannie Ferguson -- January 21, 1858
093. Samuel Wragg Ferguson to Fannie Ferguson -- January 21, 1858 Samuel Wragg Ferguson, fresh out of West Point, writes his sister from a camp on Henry's Fork in the Utah territory. Ferguson, participating in the Utah Expedition, writes about the boredom of the winter intermission in the conflict with Mormon settlers. He complains about the food and tells his sister he "is going out directly to try and kill a rabbit with my pistol." He writes fondly of spending a week at the regiment's other camp as he has "found it very dull here when there are but three officers besides myself," but notes that "when spring comes we will be kept busy all the time as the Mormons will no doubt try to steal our animals." 4p.
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094. Samuel Wragg Ferguson to F.R. Barker (Godmother) -- October 12th, 1859
094. Samuel Wragg Ferguson to F.R. Barker (Godmother) -- October 12th, 1859 Letter from Samuel Wragg Ferguson at Fort Walla Walla in the Washington Territory to his godmother. Ferguson comments on his daily routine and writes about his beloved horse, his dogs and his whiskey-drinking friend Major Green. 4p.
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095. Samuel Wragg Ferguson to F.R. Barker (Godmother) -- July 10, 1861
095. Samuel Wragg Ferguson to F.R. Barker (Godmother) -- July 10, 1861 Samuel Wragg Ferguson, aide-de-camp to General P.G.T. Beauregard, writes to his godmother from Manassas Junction, on July 10th, 1861, just days before the First Battle of Bull Run. He mentions preparations being made to set up hospitals for the sick and wounded, the capture of the privateer Savannah and Jefferson Davis' warning to Lincoln not to deal harshly with the crew. He writes that Union prisoners in Richmond, who were allowed to roam freely, were "arrested and confined in consequence of the accounts received of the trial of the crew of the Savannah." 4p.
98.
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096. Samuel Wragg Ferguson to F.R. Barker (Godmother) -- September 13, 1861
096. Samuel Wragg Ferguson to F.R. Barker (Godmother) -- September 13, 1861 Samuel Wragg Ferguson, aide-de-camp to General P.G.T. Beauregard, writes to his godmother from Fairfax Court House, Virginia, September 13th, 1861. Ferguson details a recent skirmish in Lewinsville pitting Union troops against Confederate Col. J.E.B. Stuart's men in which "we got seven killed, wounded and prisoners and know that they carried off many of their dead...fact is they wont stay to be killed." He writes of the secret construction of a battery along the Potomac that "will entirely stop the navigation of the river" and warns his godmother not to let "any communicative person hear any thing of this." On the envelope is written "there is a secret in this." 5p.
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097. Samuel Wragg Ferguson to F.R. Barker (Godmother) -- January 29, 1862
097. Samuel Wragg Ferguson to F.R. Barker (Godmother) -- January 29, 1862 Samuel Wragg Ferguson, aide-de-camp to General P.G.T. Beauregard, writes to his godmother from Centreville, Virginia, January 29th, 1862. Ferguson writes that General Beauregard has received orders to proceed to Columbus, Ky., a "new scene of action and I hope of victory and glory." He yearns for news of Union commander Ambrose Burnside's naval expedition which recently sailed and has "occupied so much attention both North and South." 3p.
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098. Samuel Wragg Ferguson to F.R. Barker (Godmother) -- March 3, 1862
098. Samuel Wragg Ferguson to F.R. Barker (Godmother) -- March 3, 1862 Samuel Wragg Ferguson, aide-de-camp to General P.G.T. Beauregard, writes to his godmother from Jackson, Tennessee on March 3rd, 1862. Ferguson writes about an offer for promotion to Lt. Colonel, the illness of Gen. Beauregard, and the successful evacuation of Columbus, Kentucky, "an imperative but most difficult problem, accomplished with wonderful luck." He questions the Union's decision not to attack during the evacuation as this would have caused "the abandonment of many heavy guns and large supplies of ammunition, now happily in position at other and better points." 4p.
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