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Photographic Record of the Cooper River Bridge

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161.
vol1_p033
vol1_p033 Image #90 (4.5" x 2.75"): "2-13-29. Erecting assembly shown in #89, completing end of cantilever arm except for dummy bottom chords L12 L13."; Image #91 (2.75" x 4.5"): "2-13-29. West side - Town Creek Span. Removing steel falsework bent #1 under anchor arm."; Image #92 (2.75" x 4.5"): "2-14-29. Joint and floorbeam at L13 ( = Lo joint of suspended span. See #93)."
162.
vol1_p036
vol1_p036 Image #95 (2.75" x 4.5"): "2-15-29. Looking down Drum Island Viaduct toward Cooper River. Viaduct Traveler C erecting."; Image #98 (2.75" x 4.5"): "2-22-29. From the peak of the Town Creek Span (U8), elev. 235 ft. looking west down the Charleston Approach."; Image #99 (2.75" x 4.5"): "2-22-29. Looking east from U8, toward Drum Island Traveler at L13, rear boom in foreground. Main boom, boomed out flat, can be seen thru the A-frame."
163.
vol1_p007
vol1_p007 Images #8, 10, 12 (2.75" x 4.5"): Caption under all photos: Dec. 2, 1928. Three views of pneumatic caisson for anchor pier #10, Cooper River Span, which tilted to an angle 29 [degrees] from the vertical. Seven negro 'sand-hogs' trapped and drowned."
164.
vol1_p100
vol1_p100 Picturing the Bridge. The story of the Cooper river bridge as told in the special editions of the Charleston newspapers was rendered vivid by the wealth of illustrations in those publications, showing progress of the work on the great structure from the beginning to the moment of opening. These pictures will make interesting history and will doubtless be shown in years to come by many of those who participated in the jubilation of yesterday and will be keen to tell of the celebration to the youngsters who will take it all for granted that there is a driveway across the Cooper for their cars. The engineers and builders of the bridge, as, indeed, all of the officers of the corporation which owns and of the contractors who built it, cooperated in every possible way with the newspapers in the making of the special editions complete records of the work and of the occasion celebrated at the opening, and to them The Evening Post expresses its appreciation and thanks. Especially is it under obligations to Mr. E. L. Durkee, engineer of the McClintic-Marshall Company, for putting at its disposal his extensive collection of photographs of the work during the various stages of its progress. The pictures tell the story of the bridge as no verbal description could and there are virtually no significant phases of the work which escaped Mr. Durkee's camera. To have had access to this collection was the good fortune of The Evening Post and of the public to whom it was enabled to present them.
165.
vol2_p100
vol2_p100 Picturing the Bridge. The story of the Cooper river bridge as told in the special editions of the Charleston newspapers was rendered vivid by the wealth of illustrations in those publications, showing progress of the work on the great structure from the beginning to the moment of opening. These pictures will make interesting history and will doubtless be shown in years to come by many of those who participated in the jubilation of yesterday and will be keen to tell of the celebration to the youngsters who will take it all for granted that there is a driveway across the Cooper for their cars. The engineers and builders of the bridge, as, indeed, all of the officers of the corporation which owns and of the contractors who built it, cooperated in every possible way with the newspapers in the making of the special editions complete records of the work and of the occasion celebrated at the opening, and to them The Evening Post expresses its appreciation and thanks. Especially is it under obligations to Mr. E. L. Durkee, engineer of the McClintic-Marshall Company, for putting at its disposal his extensive collection of photographs of the work during the various stages of its progress. The pictures tell the story of the bridge as no verbal description could and there are virtually no significant phases of the work which escaped Mr. Durkee's camera. To have had access to this collection was the good fortune of The Evening Post and of the public to whom it was enabled to present them.
166.
vol1_p022
vol1_p022 Unnumbered Image (5" x 7"): "1-28-29. West Anchor arm of the Town Creek Span and east end of the Charleston Approach Viaduct. Anchor arm is 256 ft. long (8 panels at 32 ft.). Stair tower at left."; Image #66 (4.5" x 2.75"): "1-30-29. Main bearing shoe, Pier 2, Town Creek Span. 5' 0" x 5' 9" = 28.75 [square feet]. Des. Load = 1,813,000# = 438 # [per square inch]. Erec. Load = 1,089,000# max. (suspended span cantilevered to center). Lower shoe 3' 4" high."
167.
vol2_p071
vol2_p071 Unnumbered Image (5" x 7"): "1050' Cooper River Span - July 2, 1929. Suspended span swung as a simple span and jacking chords at U17 removed for replacement by dummy chords."
168.
vol2_p006
vol2_p006 Unnumbered Image (5" x 7"): "Airplane view of the Cooper River Bridge - looking east. May 9, 1929. West approach, in foreground, completely paved. Town Creek in foreground, then Drum Island, Cooper River, and Mt. Pleasant. Charleston in lower right."
169.
vol2_p093
vol2_p093 Unnumbered Image (5" x 7"): "From the Francis Marion Hotel, overlooking the old Citadel Square. Photo by Melchers."
170.
vol2_p072
vol2_p072 Unnumbered Image (5" x 7"): "From the Mt. Pleasant shore, looking toward Charleston, East Approach and Cooper River Span at right. Town Creek Span in the distance. (About July 2, 1929)."
171.
vol2_p095
vol2_p095 Unnumbered Image (5" x 7"): "From the Mt. Pleasant shore, but further back. East Approach and the Cooper River Span on the right. Photo by Melchers."
172.
vol2_p097
vol2_p097 Unnumbered Image (5" x 7"): "Looking northwest to north. Cooper River on right. Photo by Melchers."
173.
vol1_p066
vol1_p066 Unnumbered Image (5" x 7"): "Lowering 33 ton, 150 HP Gasoline hoisting engine, under its own power. Town Creek Span. Ridden down by W.E. Omohundro, Sup't., W.S. Patterson, Pusher, and John Shelton, Engineman."
174.
vol1_p028
vol1_p028 Unnumbered Image (5" x 7"): "Progress - Town Creek Span & Drum Island Viaduct. Feb. 1, 1929 at 4:30 P.M."
175.
vol2_p012
vol2_p012 Unnumbered Image (5" x 7"): "Progress - Cooper River Span, May 17, 1929 at 4:30 P.M."
176.
vol2_p060
vol2_p060 Unnumbered Image (5" x 7"): "Progress - Cooper River Span, June 21, 1929 at 4:30 P.M. First closing bottom chord in place."
177.
vol2_p067
vol2_p067 Unnumbered Image (5" x 7"): "Progress - Cooper River Span, June 28, 1929 at 4:30 P.M. Suspended span ready to be freed from its cantilever condition and swung as a simple truss span, which was done on Sat., June 29, 1929, starting at 8 A.M. and being completed at 3: P.M."
178.
vol1_p064
vol1_p064 Unnumbered Image (5" x 7"): "Progress at 4 P.M., March 22, 1929. Town Creek Span - Drum Island Viaduct."
179.
vol1_p037
vol1_p037 Unnumbered Image (5" x 7"): "Progress Feb. 22, 1929 at 4:30 P.M."
180.
vol1_p072
vol1_p072 Unnumbered Image (5" x 7"): "Progress in Cooper River, March 29, 1929 at 4:30 P.M. Drum Island Viaduct (left) just completed. Span Traveler A (right) re-erected. Drum Island Viaduct / Pier 5 / 270' Deck Span / Pier 6 / 270' Deck Span / Pier 7 / 450' Anchor Arm / Pier 8 / 1050' Main Span (Cantilevers & Suspended Span) / Pier 9 / 450' Anchor Arm / Pier 10 / 270' / Pier 11 / 270' / Pier 12 / 270' / Pier 13 / East Approach Viaduct."
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